Apocryphal and Literary Influences on Galway Diasporic History

Apocryphal and Literary Influences on Galway Diasporic History

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Apocryphal and Literary Influences on Galway Diasporic History establishes that apocryphal stories, in all their transformations, contribute to collective memory. Common characteristics frame their analysis: irreducible and enduring elements, often embedded in archetypal drama; lack of historical verification; establishment in collective memory; revivals after periods of dormancy; subjection to political and economic manipulation; implicit speculation; and literary transformations. This book contextualises Unsettled, an Australian novel about a convict play, derived from the Irish apocryphal story of The Magistrate of Galway, and documents previously unpublished primary material, including apocryphal stories passed through generations of descendents of settlers, Martin and Maria Lynch, and The Hibernian Father, a play by Irish convict, Edward Geoghegan. It puts forward new hypotheses: that the Irish hero Cuchulain may have provided a template for the archetypal and apocryphal story of the Magistrate of Galway; that disgraced Trinity College medical student and aspiring writer, Edward Geoghegan, enacted and recounted the same father-son archetypal conflict when he was transported to Botany Bay in 1839, and wrote the The Hibernian Father based on the Magistrate of Galway; that working-class Irish families were marginalised in South-east South Australian historical records; that oral apocryphal Lynch stories may be true; that Kate Grenvillea€™s The Secret River (2006) offers an alternative history of the Hawkesbury River settlement, by some definitions apocryphal. The mystery of Geoghegana€™s disappearance is solved, and knowledge about his life increased. French theorist Gerard Genettea€™s notion, advanced in Palimpsests: Literature in the Second Degree (1997), of all novels being transtextual, provides a model for the analysis of relationships between these key apocryphal texts.Journalist Stella Clarke summarises historian Mark McKennaa#39;s 2005 essay suggesting he believes, a#39;that shea#39;s out of line: as a novelist she cana#39;t help but join ... he says that a#39;Grenville a#39;elevates fiction [emphasis added] to a position of interpretive power over and above that of historya#39;.468 McKennaa#39;s concern with the ... Such arguments cluster around ideas about whose story should be told and by whom?


Title:Apocryphal and Literary Influences on Galway Diasporic History
Author: Gay Lynch
Publisher:Cambridge Scholars Publishing - 2010-10-12
ISBN-13:

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